The Information Systems and Computer Applications examination covers material that is usually taught in an introductory college-level business information systems course.

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Should Banks Let Ancient Programming Language COBOL Die?

 COBOL is a programming language invented by Hopper from 1959 to 1961, and while it is several decades old, it’s still largely used by the financial sector, major corporations and part of the federal government. Mar Masson Maack from The Next Web interviews Daniel Doderlein, CEO of Auka, who explains why banks don’t have to actively kill COBOL and how they can modernize and “minimize the new platforms’ connections to the old systems so that COBOL can be switched out in a safe and cheap manner.” From the report: According to [Doderlein], COBOL-based systems still function properly but they’re faced with a more human problem: “This extremely critical part of the economic infrastructure of the planet is run on a very old piece of technology — which in itself is fine — if it weren’t for the fact that the people servicing that technology are a dying race.” And Doderlein literally means dying. Despite the fact that three trillion dollars run through COBOL systems every single day they are mostly maintained by retired programming veterans. There are almost no new COBOL programmers available so as retirees start passing away, then so does the maintenance for software written in the ancient programming language. Doderlein says that banks have three options when it comes to deciding how to deal with this emerging crisis. First off, they can simply ignore the problem and hope for the best. Software written in COBOL is still good for some functions, but ignoring the problem won’t fix how impractical it is for making new consumer-centric products. Option number two is replacing everything, creating completely new core banking platforms written in more recent programming languages. The downside is that it can cost hundreds of millions and it’s highly risky changing the entire system all at once. The third option, however, is the cheapest and probably easiest. Instead of trying to completely revamp the entire system, Doderlein suggests that banks take a closer look at the current consumer problems. Basically, Doderlein suggests making light-weight add-ons in more current programming languages that only rely on COBOL for the core feature of the old systems.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.